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Live From Londra: Anna Vitiello Recaps The Gucci Show at London’s Tate Modern

Courtesy of Gucci

Vogue Philippines contributing fashion editor Anna Vitiello attends Sabato De Sarno’s first resort show in London and finds something for every Gucci girl.

London could be considered, to some extent, Gucci’s second home. Before there was Florence—or even Italy—there was London. Let’s take it back to 1899 and a young Guccio Gucci who, at the age of sixteen, took a job as a porter at The Savoy Hotel in London, carrying the trunks of the famous and the wealthy. During those elevator rides, he mentally banked ideas that could improve their luggage both functionally and aesthetically, his creative vision fuelled by the rich colours and textures of The Savoy’s interiors. Twenty-four years later, he would open his first store in Florence selling—you guessed it—luggage and other travelware.

Approaching the Savoy now, over a century later, the rich history and stories that have passed through those revolving doors are still felt from the road’s approach. Today, specifically, as hoards of Gucci’s guests from all over the world spill out to attend the Cruise 2025 show. But it’s not just Gucci’s sentimental ties to London that inspired creative director, Sabato De Sarno, to stage his first ever Cruise show here. It’s a city in which he’s felt accepted, inspired and supported as a young Italian designer today.

Courtesy of Gucci

Part of the invite—a collaborative Monocle x Gucci pocketbook guide to London—celebrates the city’s unique mix of culture, architecture and talent. Within that book, amongst the hotels, restaurants and cultural hotspots is the British institution of art, culture and fashion, the Tate Modern, which last night played host to hundreds of guests. These included a bevy of celebrity supporters from Dua Lipa and Debby Harry to Stray Kids’ Lee Know and Mustafa the Poet, whose words welcomed us via a light installation in the Tate Modern’s entrance.

‘We’ll always have London,’ began De Sarno’s show notes, setting the tone for an eclectic mix of Cruise-appropriate denim, intricate beading and a finale of billowing candy-hued dresses. But it was De Sarno’s subtle reworking of the house codes that were the real story here.

The heritage piece was omnipresent throughout the collection: equestrian hardware, timeless tailoring and, of course, the iconic GG monogram all featured. But De Sarno—whilst incorporating and respecting archival elements—was looking to convey something more unexpected for this Gucci girl. Her shoe choice for a pastel pink dress? Creepers (worn with ankle socks.) Her blouse? Unbuttoned down to the navel. Her feminine ballerinas? Studded, with straps and horsebit hardware. Think Gucci girl lets loose in the big city: always on brand but never a straightforward blueprint. 

Courtesy of Gucci
Courtesy of Gucci

Creative contradictions characterised much of the collection, with a distinct mix of practicality and romanticism coming through unpredictable pairings: an oversized leather bomber laying low over billowing chiffon skirt; baggy mixed-wash denim was paired with a daisy-print pussy bow blouse. Individually, the pieces weren’t ground-breaking, but fused in this way, they evoked a sense of Italian heritage through an international lens that, we’re discovering, is unique to Sabato De Sarno.

Courtesy of Gucci
Courtesy of Gucci

The contradictions continued with more intricate detailing taking on a contemporary twist: beaded fringing swayed from the pockets of denim pants and an embroidered oversized, thigh-skimming coat was modelled on an argyle print. A dress adorned with hand-sewn daisies appeared under an oversized denim polo, accessorised with double-strand pearls and ankle socks. There was a youthfulness to these looks that didn’t take anything too seriously – an eclectic mix of pieces that felt evocative of London’s diverse style scene.

Courtesy of Gucci
Courtesy of Gucci

Yet some looks alluded to a more heritage-first approach, including a 60s-inspired tan suede monogrammed with horsebit fastenings and a matching supersized Jackie bag. Double-breasted jackets were more masculine in proportion whilst retaining a sense of longevity, and a deep red leather suite featured horsebit hardware detailing where belts and pockets would usually go.

Courtesy of Gucci
Courtesy of Gucci

One thing’s for sure: the collection is inherently wearable. What’s more, there’s something in there for every Gucci girl, whether she’s classic, eccentric or part of the brand’s ever-growing Gen Z supporter base. Some will argue that the collection didn’t do enough, and whilst it may not make the biggest splash, it’s one that celebrities and customers alike will love, be it in Italy, internationally, or, indeed, in London.

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